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Case studies

0113 266 1526 or
nicola@nicolaprior.co.uk

The diagram below illustrates my approach. First I research: what are the hot topics (Google Trends)?  What keywords are target consumers using (Keyword Planner tool)?  Then I’ll set up robust mechanisms to evaluate the creative, focused communications plan that I’ll implement.

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Field work: the forgotten marketing tool

The best campaigns rely on insights and research, but how often does that include real-time field work? A forgotten tool!

In today’s congested world of consumer communications, a campaign without real insight is unlikely to have cut-through, unlikely to resonate with the public and change behaviour. Great insights are essential to provide a fresh understanding of a product or service and how it is really used.  There are, of course, many online tools to help.  AnswerThePublic is popular which shows how people are searching online around a specific topic and Gorkana Surveys offer mass audience polling tools.  These are good examples of data that can be found at your desk.  But marketers might have forgotten a useful tool – field work.  How many of us get outside and talk to customers in shops, bars, businesses?  A good example of this was done by a London advertising agency working on the Marmite account.  The team visited customers’ homes and discovered Marmite was often forgotten, pushed to the back of the kitchen cupboard, but not actually thrown away.  This habit was repeated in many homes and triggered an entertaining campaign that proved very effective.  The agency is adamant that this creative spark would never have been ignited if they had not done this careful field work.

There is so much information online that maybe we have neglected the value of field work.  Getting out there can help us identify true insights and real-time consumer behaviour.  This knowledge will help produce a creative and differentiated campaign.  Surely it is  well worth the investment.

Taken from an article in PR Week, November 2015

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